Fertility Blog

Writing blogs is a way for the doctors at Servy Massey Fertility Institute to have an informal conversation with our patients on a variety of topics – more than 120 to date. From 2011’s “Diminished Ovarian Reserve: Blame It on Your Daddy” to 2016’s “Q&A on Sex Selection of Embryos,” our doctors’ blogs have covered a lot of ground.

The doctors at Servy Massey Fertility Institute are IVF pioneers who have been practicing medicine for nearly 30 years. During this time, Dr. Joe Massey (Atlanta) and Dr. Edouard Servy (Augusta) have helped thousands of couples build families.

In their blogs the doctors use their personal insight and expertise to examine the science, ethics and surprising facts surrounding fertility and infertility treatments. Here you will find in-depth answers to an array of fertility questions, explained in clear terms from a specialist’s point of view.

Do you have questions about fertility you’d like to see answered in a future blog? Ask us on our Facebook page or on the “Ask the Doctor” forms on each of our doctor bio pages on the website.

Gender Selection: Why & How It’s Done

Genetic testing to screen out defective embryos before implantation in IVF also reveals gender, giving parents a choice of having a boy or girl. History of gender selection Preimplantation genetic testing was initially developed in England in 1990 to detect single-gene and sex-chromosome linked diseases in at-risk couples. The test then was adapted as part … Continued

Q&A on Sex Selection of Embryos

Sex selection of your baby by deciding which gender embryo to implant for pregnancy during IVF brings up a lot of questions. Dr. Massey answers them in this informative blog.

Cryptorchidism and Male Infertility

There are many causes of male infertility. One condition that can contribute is cryptorchidism, which means hidden testis. This is incomplete testicular descent in the scrotum and may be in one or both of the testicles. The testicles descend to a scrotal position in humans in order to help with sperm production. An undescended testicle(s) … Continued